Tag Archive 'safety tips'

Oct 23 2014

Profile Image of M.K. Tenney

Tips for Throwing a Safe Halloween Party at Home – The House Plan Shop

Halloween 2014One of the best ways to keep your eyes on the little ones on Halloween may be to keep them home. Of course that may involve throwing them their own party which can still involve safety issues for you and your guests. Here are a few tips to keep everyone safe on Halloween night:

 

  • Costumes – Even if you are not hiking the neighborhood, you still want to keep the costumes safe. Shorter is better so that there is no tripping. Enlarge the eyeholes in masks or use makeup to enable children to see their best. Check the labels for fire retardant clothing.
  • Food – Be aware any food allergies that your guests may have. Common allergies include dairy, shell fish and peanuts. Stay away from small hard candies that may present a choking hazard. If using dry ice, prevent children from handling it as it can cause burns.
  • Childproof – Move any breakable items beyond reach or to another room. Don’t let a broken keepsake spoil your night. Candles may add to the atmosphere of spookiness, but don’t be tempted to use them. There are plenty of flickering lights available that are battery operated and eliminate the hazards of a flame.
  • Pets – A houseful of exuberant party goers in strange costumes could freak out your pets. Also, your guests may share too many things with your pets that shouldn’t be eaten by animals. Arrange for your pets to stay in another part of the house or away from home.
  • Guests – Know your guests. With the excitement and hubbub of escorting costumed guests in and out of your house, unescorted trick-or-treaters could accidently crash your party. That would be a scare for both you and the unknowing ghosts and goblins.
  • Plan – Plan ahead to include lots of fun activities to keep your guests busy. The good memories that they have will last a lifetime.

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Oct 06 2014

Profile Image of Curtis Cadenhead

Pedestrian Safety: International Walk and Bike to School Day

Filed under Miscellaneous,Safety

CrosswalkOctober 8, 2014 is International Walk and Bike to School Day. If your children will be walking or biking to school on Wednesday, take some time to go over our pedestrian safety tips with them.

 

  1. Always wear a bike helmet when riding a bike.
  2. Use crosswalks with crossing the street or cross at street corners.
  3. Be aware of the cars around you. Stay alert for those that are turning, backing up or pulling in and out of driveways.
  4. Be sure to use sidewalks when available. If there is not sidewalk, travel on the shoulder of the road and face the oncoming traffic.
  5. Avoid using electronic devises when crossing the road.
  6. If you must use a cell phone while walking or biking, stop and find a safe place to use it.
  7. Make eye contact with drivers before crossing so that you know that they see you.
  8. Pay attention for cars backing out of driveways or out of parking spaces as well as those that are turning.
  9. Do not enter the street from behind parked cars. The parked car will block you from the view of oncoming drivers.
  10. Be alert for cars moving in or out of driveways.
  11. Wear light or reflective clothing especially if you must be out walking/biking after dark.
  12. Stick with your normal walking/biking route or use only parent approved alternatives.

 

For children aged 5 to 19, pedestrian injuries are the fifth leading cause of injury-related death with teens accounting for half of those deaths. Take time to walk around the neighborhood with your kids and set a good example. Only walk or bike routes that you’ve approved for them to travel when you are not present. Make sure they know the safest routes. Provide them with reflective clothing or reflective stickers for backpacks and book bags. Remind them to speak up and warn others if they notice another pedestrian in danger.

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May 20 2014

Profile Image of M.K. Tenney

Hurricane Season: How to Prepare – The House Plan Shop

HurricaneHurricane season can last almost a half year (typically June – November), and with hurricane season quickly approaching, you don’t want to be caught off guard. If you live in a coastal area, now is a good time to review your emergency plan and prepare your home and family in case disaster strikes. Review these tips and hints to help you prepare:

  • Create an Emergency Supply Kit – Create your own emergency supply kit. Consider storing these items in a waterproof container: First aid kit, flashlights, blankets, clothing, shoes, water, non-perishable food, radio, prescriptions, toiletries, insect repellant, extra keys, important documents like insurance policies, emergency phone numbers and some cash. Include a phone charger that plugs into the car’s power system for at least one of your cell phones. If you have children, include toys to keep them occupied and of course bring the usual diaper bag contents for infants. Don’t forget leashes and carriers for the pets.
  • Prepare you Auto – Keep your car maintained and the tank full of gas. Know ahead of time the safest route to an emergency shelter and keep in mind alternate routes in case yours becomes blocked.
  • Safety – Safety features in your house should include smoke alarms, fire extinguishers, and carbon monoxide detectors. Consider learning first aid, including CPR. Know when and how to turn off your utilities. Review with your children how to call 911 and other emergency numbers.
  • Have a Plan – Everyone may not be at home when the storm hits, so designate a meeting place and review it with all family members. Also, designate a friend or relative that lives away from the storm’s path, as an emergency contact. Write down all contact information for each family member to carry with them. Practice your plan so that everyone can remain calm and competent when the storm actually hits.
  • Keep Informed – Register for emergency alerts for your cell phone, tablet or computer. Bad weather can take out phone lines and cell towers so be sure to keep a battery powered radio tuned to the appropriate channel/station. Know the difference between a Hurricane Watch and a Hurricane Warning. A watch means a hurricane could happen, while a warning means that it will happen. This is when all of your preparation and practice will go into effect.

With these helpful tips and a little planning your and your family will be better prepared should a hurricane make land fall in your area.

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Mar 25 2014

Profile Image of M.K. Tenney

National Walk to Work Day: Pedestrian Safety Tips – The House Plan Shop

Filed under Miscellaneous,Safety

National Walk to Work DayWhether it’s jogging, walking the dog, or running to catch a bus, all of us join the ranks, sooner or later, of the most vulnerable users of the road. Thousands of pedestrians are injured or die every year along our roadways. As we look forward to National Walk to Work day on April 4, 2014, review these reminders of how to keep yourself safe on the road.

1. Use the Crosswalk – Of course everyone remembers the rule about not crossing in the middle of the block, we just need to remember to follow it. When crossing at busy intersections don’t assume drivers will yield the right-of-way to pedestrians.

2. Increase Visibility – During the day wear light or bright colors. Add reflective clothing at night and carry a flashlight to help you see and to be seen by motorists.

3. Use Sidewalks – Take the sidewalk whenever one is available. If a sidewalk is unavailable and you must walk in the street, walk on the side facing the oncoming traffic.

4. Be Aware – Avoid the distractions of using electronic devices. Keep headphone volume low enough to still be able to hear what’s going on around you. If you have a particularly distracting phone call or text, stop a moment in a safe place to attend to it.

5. Walk Defensively – It’s no different than what you do when driving. Keep an eye out for cars displaying erratic behavior or speeding. If the driver is too preoccupied to control his vehicle, he is not watching out for you.

6. Don’t Drink and Walk – Okay that may sound like a joke or a cliché, but seriously, a third of pedestrians killed in traffic accidents are legally drunk. Alcohol impairs judgment and slows reaction times. Well, you know the drill, just don’t do it.

So if you choose to walk to work on April 4th or any other time you opt to walk instead of drive or take the bus, remember to follow these pedestrian safety tips.

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Oct 21 2013

Profile Image of M.K. Tenney

Halloween Safety Tips for Your Family – The House Plan Shop

Trick or TreatersWith Halloween just days away, it is necessary to think about your family’s safety on this special night. Below are some Halloween safety tips that you probably already know, but please read through them as a reminder to stay safe this Halloween. Remember scary is only good if it’s fun!

  • Accompanied by an Adult – Children should always be chaperoned, preferably by their parents. There is safety in numbers, so travel in groups if possible, and know where you are heading before you start out on Halloween night.
  • Unrestricted Costumes – Make sure your children’s costumes are short enough that they won’t trip when walking. Enlarge the eyeholes in masks or use makeup instead, to help them see where they are going. If they are carrying any props like swords or brooms, make sure they are flexible to prevent injury if they should fall.
  • Light It Up – Bring along flashlights with fresh batteries to help brighten your path. Use reflective tape or glow lights on costumes to help little ones to be seen. Try to stay on well-lighted streets and go only to the houses that have a porch light on at the front door.
  • Don’t Eat the Candy – Wait until you get back home and have time to go through all the loot your children receive.  Inspect wrappers for tampering of course, but also check for choking hazards like small hard candies or toys and items your children are allergic to.
  • Identify Your Auto – If you are staying with the car while sending your trick-or-treaters up to the porches, remember cars can look alike in the dark. Decorate your dash board or radio antenna with something that lights up so the little ones can easily identify their ride. Be sure they are aware to enter the car on the curbside instead of the street side. Don’t forget seatbelts, even if it is a short ride.
  • Obey the Law – Remind little ones the proper way to cross the street, using crosswalks and signal lights when possible. Stay on sidewalks and do not cut through alleys. Some communities post a curfew for trick-or-treating, so start early and get home in a timely manner.

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