Archive for October, 2011

Oct 26 2011

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Comfortable & Stylish: Featured Empty-Nester House Plan – The House Plan Shop

Empty-Nester House Plan 046H-0033Prefect for singles or couples who have raised their children and are looking forward to a comfortable and relaxed retirement, this empty-nester house plan is worth taking a closer look. Designed all on one level, the floor plan delivers comfortable spaces and practical features like an open floor plan, main level laundry room, walk-in shower in the master bath and a flexible library that easily converts to a guest bedroom when all the grandkids arrive for the weekend. You’ll appreciate the front and rear, covered porches, perfect for visiting with guests while enjoying after dinner drinks outdoors. The vaulted ceilings in the great room and dining area generate a sense of spaciousness making any special gathering open and relaxed. The secondary bedroom in the rear is just right for baby boomers who have an aging relative in their care. The nearby full bath is conveniently located. Efficient features include generous counter space in the pass-thru kitchen, a handy pantry, 2-car garage and ample closet space throughout. The corner fireplace, fanciful ceiling treatment topping the master bedroom and the splashy garden tub are just a few of the elegant extras this ranch house plan has to offer.

 

If you’d like to view other Empty-Nester house plans, please browse The House Plan Shop’s extensive collection.

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Oct 19 2011

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Will My House Plans include Electrical, Plumbing and HVAC Details? – The House Plan Shop

House Plans 001H-0044The home plans published by The House Plan Shop are considered stock plans or pre-drawn blueprints designed to meet the national building codes in place at the time each was created. They do not necessarily meet any state, county or municipal building codes. Furthermore, pre-drawn house plans do not include extensive information regarding HVAC, electrical and plumbing details.

 

Information about the HVAC will be determined locally. The HVAC system will depend on the climate, types of unit(s) you use, and the size of your home/amount of finished living space to be heated and cooled. Necessary ductwork will be determined by the type of heating and cooling system selected and local building codes. Discuss and review all HVAC information with your local HVAC professional or your contractor.

 

While some stock home plans include a simple electrical plan indicating the suggested locations of outlets, switches and fixtures, it will be up to your builder or local electrician to install all electrical elements according to local electrical code. Take time to review the electrical information and details with your builder or electrician before construction begins.

 

Finally, plumbing fixtures are included in stock house plans. However, the blueprints will not reflect a plumbing schematic. The sewer system and flow of water lines are site specific and must be determined by local professionals. Talk with your plumber or contractor to discuss plumbing details.

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Oct 12 2011

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Fire Prevention Week: 6 Home Fire Prevention Tips

Fire Prevention WeekIt is Fire Prevention Week. Here are six important tips/practices for fire prevention and safety in your home. Practice these safety tips in your home to decrease the chances of a home fire.

 

1.    Use Electricity Safely: Check all electrical cords (including extension cords) in your home and replace any that are cracked, frayed or show signs of other damage. If an electrical appliance starts to smoke or smells like it is burning, unplug it immediately. Replace the appliance or have it repaired. Never run cords under rugs and do not overload extension cords or outlets. Fuses and circuit breakers protect you from fire. Do not tamper with the fuse box or use fuses of the improper size.

2.    Cook with Care and Attention: Keep all cooking areas clear from combustibles including the barbecue grill. Never leave anything cooking unattended. Turn handles of pots and pans inward to keep them out or reach of children and prevent someone from bumping the handle and knocking the pot or pan off the stove.

3.    Make Space for Space Heaters: If you use a space heater, it should be place three feet from anything that can catch fire and burn such as curtains, bedding, clothing, paper and furniture. Do not let space heaters run when you are not home or when you are sleeping. Also, keep children and pets away from them.

4.    Candle Safety: While many view candles as a decorative item, they are a huge hazard in homes. Use common sense with candles. Never leave a burning candle unattended in any room in the house, even if you are in the next room. Do not burn candles when you go to bed. Never place a lit candle near combustibles such as curtains, bedding or cabinets. Place lit candles out of reach of children. Do not place burning candles in places like the coffee table or end tables where they can easily be knocked over by people or pets.

5.    Matches are for Adults: Matches and lighters are extremely dangerous when in the hands of a child. Keep them stored in a place out of reach from children and do not leave them in view. Teach children from early on that they are for adults only. If a child finds matches or a lighter, they should tell an adult immediately.

6.    Cool a Burn: Is someone gets burned, immediately place the wound in cool water for 15-20 minutes to relieve the burning sensation and pain. If the burn blisters, chars or becomes an open wound, seek medical attention right away. 

 

It is important to practice these safety tips year round in an effort to prevent a fire in your home.

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Oct 05 2011

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Empty-Nester House Plans and Baby Boomer Homes – The House Plan Shop

Empty-Nester House Plan 053H-0061 If you have raised your kids and are on the road to retirement or perhaps have already retired, Empty-Nester house plans are for you! They are designed for those who have reached the point in life when it is time to kick back, relax and enjoy past accomplishments and the future. Most Empty-Nester home plans showcase comfortable spaces and practical features that will carry occupants through the next phases of life. In many cases these thoughtful house plans are designed with one-story allowing for easy, single-level living. Some might be built on finished basements delivering extra living space on the lower level, ideal for those who need extra entertainment space or bedrooms for holiday weekends when the kids and grandkids come to visit. Most Empty-Nester house plans share a few common characteristics and design elements making them appealing to singles and couples of retirement age. They are designed with an open floor plan often combining the living room, kitchen and dining space into one large gathering area. Not only does this arrangement work well for entertaining, but should occupants one day find themselves in need of a walker or wheelchair, this barrier-free layout allows mobility and access to the main parts of the home in a safe manor. Furthermore, many designs enjoy outdoor living spaces such as a screened porch, deck or covered patio. These home plans for retirees generally incorporate a main level master suite with a roomy bath. Frequently, a walk-in shower is included in the bath allowing accessibility for those who may have trouble getting in and out of a bathtub later in life. There is also room for safety features like grab bars near the toilet, shower and bathtub. Sometimes, Empty-Nester floor plans include at least one secondary bedroom room for use as a guest suite when weekend visitors arrive. Flexible spaces are often included with baby boomer friendly house plans like a den or hobby room that can flex as needs or lifestyles change. Finally, Empty-Nester house plans are fashioned with comfort and low maintenance in mind. They are designed with easy-to-care-for interiors and exteriors.

 

Take some time and enjoy browsing our Empty-Nester House Plans.

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